What You Should Do Before Evacuating Your House

Article Written by:
Glenn Nader, University of California Cooperative Extension, Yuba City, CA
Ed Smith, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Reno, NV

 

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The first step is to make sure every body and everything is ready to leave. Park the vehicles facing toward the road and load important documents and items. Prepare elderly, children, pets and any livestock for evacuation. If there is enough time, prepare the house for exposure to embers and flames. Accomplishing these items will be doable only …

Ensuring Firefighter Access and Your Escape During a Wildfire

If there is a wildfire in your area you may need to get out and firefighters may need to get in, so build fire safety into your road or driveway designs and make plans for evacuation and access.

First, the road. Having more than one way into and out of a residential area is good in case one road gets blocked. Roads should be at least two lanes wide, with gentle curves and with enough space at the end for …

Evacuation Preparations for Your Livestock


Photo source: Susie Heffernan

Prepare before the fire occurs by keeping the corrals and barns free of fuel (vegetation or hay) and have halters or facilities to load and remove the animals. Have an evacuation plan for livestock, including routes, transportation needs, and host site. Share your plan with your neighbors in case you are absent. Do not wait to the last minute to transport livestock as roads can become clogged and difficult to maneuver with a trailer. Make sure …

Items to Take When Evacuating

Article Written by:
Glenn Nader, University of California Cooperative Extension, Yuba City, CA

 

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When preparing to evacuate, deciding what you should take depends on how much time you have, but you should plan on being evacuated for 72 hours. You can reduce preparation time by planning ahead what you want to take and organizing these valuable items in such a way that they are easy to assemble. It is a good idea to keep important papers, irreplaceable photos and inventory …

Emergency Automated Telephone Notification During Fires

Article Written by:
Glenn Nader, University of California Cooperative Extension, Yuba City, CA

 

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In some areas, residents will receive a recorded call and/or text message from an automated telephone notification system on their cell phone. If authorities have enough time and personnel, fire services, law enforcement, or emergency responders generally attempt to stop at homes to personally alert residents during the evacuation. Media outlets may announce the evacuation, or it may be placed on local government Web sites.

The automated …

What To Do if Trapped in Car by Fire While Evacuating

Fire near dirt road

A structure offers more protection than a car, so if there is a building nearby, get inside it. If there is no building, then stay in your car. It will be safer than being out in the open with direct exposure to flames and radiant heat.

  • Park the car in a safe place that has little or no vegetation.
  • Turn on headlights and emergency flashers to make your car more visible during heavy smoke.
  • Close all windows and doors, shut

Deciding When It Is Too Late to Safely Evacuate From a Fire

Article Written by:
Glenn Nader, University of California Cooperative Extension, Yuba City, CA

 

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There is no universal answer to when it is too late to safely evacuate in a fire, as fire location and speed will vary greatly. In general, traveling on the roads when the fire is in the area increases the risk. The closer the fire, the more dangerous it is to be on the road as smoke can limit visibility, and evacuation routes can be cut off …

Evacuation Preparations for Your Pets

Article Written by:
Glenn Nader, University of California Cooperative Extension, Yuba City, CA

 

Have pet carriers ready in case you need to evacuate. This will prevent the animals from escaping during evacuation by limiting their movement in the vehicle and when you arrive at the evacuation destination. Make sure you have a leash if your dog(s) are too large to fit in a pet carrier. Many shelters do not take pets, so make plans before …

Making Evacuation Less Stressful

Article Written by:
Glenn Nader, University of California Cooperative Extension, Yuba City, CA

 

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Making Evacuation Less Stressful

Pre-fire planning and taking action ahead of time, including making a list of what to do and what to take with you, is the best way to reduce the potential stress of an evacuation.

Some pre-fire evacuation tasks include:

  • taking a home inventory;
  • developing and discussing a disaster response plan with your household that identifies planned actions, such as:
    • evacuation routes,
    • emergency meeting

Safely Returning to Your Home After a Wildfire

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Safely Returning to Your Home after a Wildfire

Many homeowners wonder when it is safe to return to their homes after a wildfire. Once you are given the “all clear” to go home, what you should look for outside and inside the home to ensure you and your families safety?

In most states, permission to return home after a wildfire is usually given by a local fire or law enforcement authority such as your county sheriff’s office. They deem it …